Three reasons to keep your sick kids home from school

When a child is severely ill, and can hardly get out of bed, you obviously wouldn’t send the child to school. However, if a child is well enough to walk into the living room, and turn on the TV while sick, you may think the kid is well enough to go to school. However, sometimes, it’s best to keep a kid home. There are several reasons why it’s important to isolate your child at home during these less drastic illnesses.

3 reasons to keep sick kids home from school


Keeping your sick kids home from school

Your child will spread germs

A child doesn’t need to run a high fever, and be bedridden, in order to be contagious. A child with a low-grade fever or various symptoms, such as coughing or sneezing, may also transmit illnesses to others. You certainly don’t want to cause other children to get sick. In addition, there’s always a chance the germs could make their way back to one of your children to cause additional sickness. When you isolate your child at home, you prevent germs from spreading unnecessarily.

You may also find your child’s school has other options for them to keep up. This may not be true in every case, but if a college can offer a master of social work online program, your student’s high school may be capable of offering core classes online for extended absences.

Your child needs to rest

A sick child needs to rest so he, or she, recovers from an illness. If a child’s body gets too rundown, the condition can become much more serious. For example, a common cold may turn into bronchitis, or even pneumonia. Remember some of these more serious conditions could result in hospitalization, and long-term recovery. It’s best to give your child an extra day or two recovering at home than to risk the development of a more serious health condition.

Superbugs are evolving

Because illnesses are spreading so quickly, and are often treated with the same medications, new strains of superbugs are evolving. These superbugs are resistant to treatment from many types of antibiotics. While this may not affect your child today, the infection of a superbug may occur in the future. This can make the condition difficult to treat.

While parents don’t want to see their children sick, many also don’t want them to miss school unnecessarily. Your impulse may be to send kids to school when they’re not entirely better, but this can be detrimental.

Guest writer: Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer, as well as a blogger. She lives, and works, out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors, and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. Connect with Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

By | 2018-01-25T08:54:01+00:00 February 21, 2018|Lifestyle|0 Comments

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